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Class 3: A Greener Future

Page history last edited by Ian D Goddard 10 years, 9 months ago

 

“What is TED

 

We watched a short movie created by AutoDesk at TED 2007 using “post-it” notes in a fascinating theme to show the diversity and cohesion of the TED phenomenon.  Link not available.

 

Edward Burtynsky: Share the story of Earth’s manufactured landscapes

 

“Accepting his 2005 TED Prize, photographer Edward Burtynsky makes a wish: that his images -- stunning landscapes that document humanity's impact on the world -- help persuade millions to join a global conversation on sustainability.”* There are places in America where our landscape has, or is being destroyed, however, around the world the situation is much worse.  Burtynsky’s eye for capturing images shows us, not only the adulteration, but also the strange allure, of these places and the effect of burgeoning populations around the world.

  

 

 

Chris Jordan: Picturing Excess

 

Bringing statistics to life in amazing photographs Jordan succeeds in showing us the massive impact of consumer life styles practiced in our western culture.  Developing nations are starting to join us in changing the face of our environment and polluting the oceans. Pictures like these as well as the work of others are beginning to bring awareness to the world.  Our focus needs to be on the environment and not necessarily only on “global warming.”

 

 

  

 

Jared Diamond: Why societies collapse        

 

“Why do societies fail? With lessons from the Norse of Iron Age Greenland, deforested Easter Island and present-day Montana, Jared Diamond talks about the signs that collapse is near, and how -- if we see it in time -- we can prevent it.”*  In this talk on the theme of his book “Collapse” Diamond presents very interesting facts and draws conclusions regarding the impact of cultures on the environment and sustainability.

 

 

  

 

Question: How can we better discuss and share our thoughts?  

Comments (4)

Ian D Goddard said

at 10:32 am on Jan 26, 2009

I think that we could use this Wiki as a place to write our comments about the TED talks and see what others think.

pat.bogart@mac.com said

at 12:29 am on Jan 28, 2009

I think this is a great idea and could be a great forum for our continuing discussions. Who knows we may even get family and friends in on our talks. Ian, yesterday at the Mac Users Group Meeting several people brought up the "fantastic TED talks" that Ian Goddard showed them at the Home Technology Series presentation you made!

Ian D Goddard said

at 2:34 pm on Jan 28, 2009

The following from Myron Miller:

Great job, Ian! I sure do appreciate all the effort you putting into make this such a great class! The first video this morning was a shocker. I have seen so many signs of the degradation of our planet in my 76 years, starting with the strip mining in Western Pennsylvania which tore apart some of the areas that were my play sites as a kid. Then there are the often not-hidden acres of trashed cars in dumps in what was once beautiful countryside. The area where Flight 93 crashed in Pennsylvania is a big blighted area where strip mining has killed the landscape.

I've been on a trip up the Three Gorges and seen the ruination of the countryside as factories have sprung up the river for miles and miles. And the pollution in Shanghai reminded me of the 1940s in Pittsburgh. Those tattered landscapes and the views of the Chinese factories have me reeling. I'm not sure what we can do about it, but perhaps our children's generation CAN do something about it.

Carol Holmes said

at 1:36 pm on Jan 29, 2009

Edward Burtynsky's talk brought to mind a book I recently read by Kelsey Timmerman: Where Am I Wearing? A Global Tour To The Countries, Factories And People That Make Our Clothes. It is a young writer's account of his journey to find out about the people who make his clothes. China is one of the places he visits. His account takes you from the factory, into the people's homes and lives. It is quite a journey.

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